Cinderella

A ballet by Sir Frederick Ashton

Jeffrey Cirio and Misa Kuranaga with artists of Boston Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella by Gene Schiavone.

Jeffrey Cirio and Misa Kuranaga with artists of Boston Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella

Photo credit: Gene Schiavone

A fairytale classic that sparkles with heart and humor.

Petra Conti with artists of Boston Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella

Photo credit: Gene Schiavone

Boyko Dossev, Yury Yanowsky, and Misa Kuranaga in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella

Photo credit: Gene Schiavone

Petra Conti with artists of Boston Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella

Photo credit: Gene Schiavone

Boyko Dossev, Yury Yanowsky, and Misa Kuranaga in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella

Photo credit: Gene Schiavone

Act I: A room in the house of Cinderella’s father

The Stepsisters are busily preparing for the court ball. Cinderella sits quietly by the fire looking at her mother’s portrait and think of happier times. Her father wishes to be kind to her but is afraid of his bad tempered stepdaughters who scold him for comforting Cinderella. Cinderella, using her broom as her dance partner, dreams of dancing with a prince at the ball, creating a lovely solo tinged with sadness and humor.

Her dream is interrupted by a beggar-woman who asks for alms. The Stepsisters send her away but Cinderella gives her bread. The old woman leaves, giving Cinderella a kind look.

Dressmakers, shoemakers, hairdressers, a jeweler, and a dance master arrive to prepare the Stepsisters for the ball. All but Cinderella leave for the ball.

Cinderella returns to her dreams. The old woman re-appears and reveals herself as Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother. She calls on the Fairies of the Four Seasons and their attendants who bring gifts to reward Cinderella for her kindness and prepare her for the ball. Cinderella leaves in a coach escorted by the Seasons and the Stars; the Fairy Godmother warns that she must leave the ball before the clock strikes midnight or all is lost.

Jeffrey Cirio and Misa Kuranaga with artists of Boston Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella by Gene Schiavone.

Jeffrey Cirio and Misa Kuranaga with artists of Boston Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton's Cinderella

Photo credit: Gene Schiavone

Act II: A hall at the palace

Courtiers move in a formal dance and a jester dances alone. Cinderella’s father and the Stepsisters arrive, as does the Prince. Mysterious music is heard. Cinderella arrives and is believed to be a princess. The Prince, enraptured, offers her three rare oranges.

Prince and Cinderella, alone, declare their love for each other. A waltz begins. Enthralled, Cinderella forgets the warning. The clock strikes midnight. Cinderella rushes from the palace, losing a slipper. The Prince holds it and vows to find the woman he loves.
 

Act III: After the ball.

Cinderella awakens. A slipper in her apron proves that she was not dreaming about the ball. The Stepsisters return and tell Cinderella about the ball. Word arrives of the Prince’s search for the owner of the slipper. The Prince enters and the Stepsisters try on the slipper. As Cinderella helps, the second slipper falls from her apron, and the Prince recognizes her.

The Fairy Godmother appears and unites the lovers, who live happily ever after.

Cinderella

May 10–June 8, 2019

The illusion we create is intended to deepen your understanding of reality.

Mikko Nissinen, Artistic Director
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